Lil Boosie Lands in Jail Again for Marijuana Possession After Being Free for Only a Couple of Hours

BATON ROUGE – “F*ck, not again” was the only thing Lil Boosie reportedly said during his arrest. Rapper Lil Boosie finds himself in jail again for marijuana possession. In just less than 24 hours from being released from a Louisiana prison, Lil Boosie has been arrested again for illegal drugs, and if found guilty, will receive a minimum of 2 years in prison.

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Lil Boosie was just released from prison yesterday after serving a prison term of about 5 years for multiple crimes including illegal drug possession, violation of probation, and federal charges on first-degree murder. It is reported that Louisiana police coincidentally happened to be walking down the street as Boosie walked out the door of an apartment “reaking of weed”. The two officers then searched Boosie and found a bag filled with a quarter-pound of weed in his jacket pocket.

According to Louisiana police officer Julia Alvarez, “I can’t believe he would even dare carry that much marjuana again, well, he was looking for trouble”. Boosie will appear before a judge late March.

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Woman Arrested After Killing Boyfriend Who Fake Proposed As An April Fools Prank

NEW YORK CITY – A New York woman is facing murder charges after she allegedly shot her boyfriend for playing an April Fools prank on her.

Lisa Estevez, 31, is facing first degree murder charges after she s

 

hot and killed Ray Jordan, age 25, in the chest. According to authorities, Lisa shot Ray after an April fools prank had gone terribly wrong. Authorities say Ray, who had been dating Lisa for 3 years, apparently got on his knees and proposed to Lisa, only to them open the engagement ring box and reveal the words “April Fools” written inside with no engagement ring to be found. Lisa then immediately reached for Jordan’s firearm, which was laying on the living room couch and shot Jordan once in the chest, killing him instantly.

Authorities arrived to the home when neighbors reported the gunshots. “We arrived at the scene and saw Mr. Jordan’s corpse” says NYPD officer James Patterson, “Then I looked to his side and immediately saw the Engagement ring box with “April Fools” written inside and immediately knew what had happened”. finished Officer Patterson.

Lisa was then found, according to officers, taking a sh*t” in the home bathroom while watching YouTube videos on her laptop on how to get rid of dead bodies. Lisa apparently did not hear the police enter the home as she was watching the videos with her earphones on. Lisa was arrested on site and “not even allowed to finish taking her sh*t”.

Lisa will appear in a court of law in a few weeks and possibly face 40 years in prison.

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Top 11 Low Carb Myths

I bet you’ve heard all the top 10 low carb myths already – it’s dangerous, it’s unhealthy, it’s unsustainable, it’s restrictive, there’s no evidence – well let me explain why all those low carb myths are unfounded, and in fact, I can show you how each of the low carb myths can be counter-argued.

I bet you've all heard them, the top 10 low carb myths about how it's difficult, dangerous, unghealthy and unsustainable. Well this post FINALLY explains why all the myths are unfounded and dangerous

Top 10 Low Carb Myths

Generally low carb myths are being circulated by those who may not have researched low carb and make assumptions, or by those who haven’t caught up with the science. Studies continue to support the fact that low carb is an excellent choice for weight loss, heart health, diabetes (T1 and T2), nutrition, gut health, mental clarity and more information is coming to light regarding the ketogenic diet in the role of adjunctive cancer therapy.

  1. We eat no carbs and we restrict fruit and vegetables – firstly we are low carb not no carb and secondly there are no essential carbohydrates known. We have esential fatty acids and essential proteins, but there is no such thing as an essential carbohydrate. We eat fruit, but we choose nutrient dense fruit such as berries, but stay away from high sugar tropical fruits such as mango, bananas and pineapple. When we do eat carbs, it is from nutrient dense lower carb vegetables, nuts, berries and dairy. Our vegetable intake for most people actually increases. We remove the processed carbs from our diet and replace them with more vegetables. We no longer use carbs such as rice, pasta and bread to bulk up our meals, we use vegetables.
  2. We eat far too much meat and protein – sorry, another myth. We eat moderate protein. Too  much protein is converted into glucose in the body via gluconeogenesis. We also advocate to eat meat that has had minimal intervention such as steaks, roasts, drumsticks, organ meats. There is a vast difference between processed meat such as hotdogs and burgers to meat such as steak, roasts, chops and ham on the bone. Protein is required for essential amino acids.
  3. Our diet isn’t variedWe eat a full variety of whole foods. When you take out the carbs what is left? Everything else. Take a look at the picture below. A high carb diet actually crowds out nutrition. A low carb diet crowds out junk. A sandwich has very little nutrition (with only a few scant nutritious ingredients inside) compared to a large salad. Having sushi for example, is the equivalent of eating white bread (in terms of carbs) and very little nutritious fillings inside. Take a look at this sushi autopsy. In fact when you go low carb, your diet will consist of meat, vegetables, fruit, nuts, seeds and healthy fats. Click on my recipe finder, you will see how varied our meals are. Many who have gone low carb say they have started cooking for themselves for the first time and love experimenting with new recipes and new foods.
  4. We are restricted to what we can eat – again another myth sorry. We restrict the products we eat. Do you know every year thousands of new products come into the marketplace. Do you also know that 85% of them have some form of added sugar? We eat a huge variety of foods, just not processed products. The problem in modern times is that so many products or fake foods contain sugars and grains, so it may appear that we are heavily restricted, but only because there are thousands of products available which we choose not to eat. By removing processed food, you almost become low carb by default.
  5. Low carb isn’t sustainable long term – myth again. Studies continually show that once people go low carb and give up sugars and grains, they do it for good. That is part of the success of such a way of eating as once you learn how damaging these are to our bodies and appetite, you actually don’t want to touch them again, rather than constantly fighting your will power. Maybe that’s why the sugar and grain industries are fighting back so vehemently. Once they lose a customer, they lose them for life.
  6. We are tired because we need carbs for energy – most people report that they have never had so much energy. Fat is a far more sustaining fuel than carbs. Once we use up all our stored carbs (glycogen) we switch to fat burning mode. We have an almost unlimited supply of energy in our fat stores. You will no longer be on the sugar roller coaster, with afternoon slumps and evening munchies.
  7. Low carb is another fad diet – humans have been eating low carb for thousands of generations, it is in fact our current high carb guidelines that should be seen as a fad diet. People tend to use the term ‘fad diet’ as a derogatory term when diets don’t work, but low carb works and it works long term. Entire populations thrive on low carb diets. The first book was published in 1862 by William Banting and Dr Harvey who prescribed weight loss by eating no bread, no pasta, no sugar, no beer, no starch – only meat, fish, and vegetables. Ask your grandparents what they did to lose a little weight – they stopped eating bread and potatoes.
  8. All that fat will give us heart disease – nope. Study after study has repeatedly shown us that it is the carbs in our diet that increases inflammation, creates the dangerous form of LDL cholesterol carrier (tiny, angry oxidised LDL), raised triglycerides, raises our risk of heart disease and Type 2 diabetes (which is one of the biggest risk factors of heart disease). Eating low carb and healthy fats actually reduces every single risk factor. Reducing your carbs will reduce your triglycerides (best predictor of heart disease), reduce blood pressure, improves HDL and improves the size and type of LDL. Read further on the cholesterol myth to really understand how important cholesterol is to us, and having a low level is just as much of a concern as having the wrong type.
  9. We don’t eat enough fibre – Hmm, all those leafy greens we’re getting isn’t enough? Nuts, seeds, coconut? But how much fibre is enough anyway? The myth of losing fibre from wholegrain bread is a persistent myth. Wholegrain bread is quite often processed then the fibre and grains added back in then fortified with vitamins. I’d rather get my fibre from whole foods with minimal human intervention.
  10. Ketosis is dangerous – firstly going low carb does not necessarily mean you will be in ketosis all the time, but actually most people frequently are anyway and they don’t realise it. Ever wonder how you survive your sleep and are not eating? Your body switches to fat burning once all it’s glycogen stores are used and will run quite happily on fat. Fat is released from your fat cells into your blood stream, these fatty acids are turned into ketones which fuel the body and brain. Ketosis is entirely different to ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis is a condition that occurs in Type 1 diabetics where the level of ketones in the body cannot be controlled, it makes the blood acidic and can be fatal. See this infographic which illustrates the difference of ketosis vs ketoacidosis, then click here to be taken to an incredible article on ketosis.
  11. Our brain needs glucose as fuel – our brain can be fuelled by both glucose and ketones, which is how the human race has survived famines and periods of fasting since time immemorial. The brain can efficiently run on ketones, in fact this is what gives many people such mental clarity and continuous concentration that they have never experienced before when on a high carb diet. A ketogenic diet has an anti seizure effect for those with epilepsy. Ketosis is also a better environment for neuronal recover and repair, reduction of seizures and prevention of Alzheimer’s. If any glucose is required by certain parts of the brain, our bodies can produce it from protein through gluconeogenesis. So it appears that glucose is not the preferred fuel for the brain at all.So is low carb is dangerous? – By reading all the low carb myths and research that counter-argues them, hopefully I have managed to put some uncertainty at rest. Why do others claim low carb is dangerous? The above myths just aren’t true. What is dangerous however, is eating processed food, and the incredible high carb diet which the majority eat, leading to obesity, heart disease, insulin resistance, Alzheimer’s and if that hasn’t convinced you, here’s another 30 reasons why sugar and carbs are bad for us.Low carb improves our health in almost every way – weight loss, reduces hunger, improves metabolic syndrome, improves blood lipid profiles, reduces risk of heart disease, reduces blood pressure, improves insulin sensitivity and improves glycemic control, reduces triglycerides, reduces risk of T2 diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer’s, and low carb diets are easier to adhere to versus low fat diets. Reducing our carb intake and preventing insulin resistance can be one of the most powerful things we can do to live a long and healthy life.

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Fibromyalgia Mystery Finally Solved!

Researchers Find Main Source of Pain in Blood Vessels

Fibromyalgia Mystery Finally Solved! Researchers Find Main Source of Pain in Blood Vessels

Researchers have found the main source of pain in Fibromyalgia patients, and contrary to what many believe, it does not stem from the brain. The findings mark the end of a decades-old mystery about the disease, which many doctors believed was conjured in patients’ imaginations. The mystery of Fibromyalgia has left millions of sufferers searching for hope in pain medications. Up until recently, many physicians thought that the disease was “imaginary” or psychological, but scientists have now revealed that the main source of pain stems from a most unlikely place- excess blood vessels in the hand.

The discovery may lead to new treatments and perhaps even a total cure in the future, bringing relief to as many as 5 million Americans thought to have the disease. To solve the Fibromyalgia mystery, researchers zeroed in on the skin from the hand of one patient who had a lack of the sensory nerve fibers, causing a reduced reaction to pain. They then took skin samples from the hands of Fibromyalgia patients and were surprised to find an extremely excessive amount of a particular type of nerve fiber called arteriole-venule (AV) shunts.

Up until this point scientists had thought that these fibers were only responsible for regulating blood flow, and did not play any role in pain sensation, but now they’ve discovered that there is a direct link between these nerves and the widespread body pain that Fibromyalgia sufferers feel.

The breakthrough also could solve the lingering question of why many sufferers have extremely painful hands as well as other “tender points” throughout the body, and why cold weather seems to aggravate the symptoms. In addition to feeling widespread deep tissue pain, many Fibromyalgia patients also suffer from debilitating fatigue.

Neuroscientist Dr. Frank L. Rice explained: “We previously thought that these nerve endings were only involved in regulating blood flow at a subconscious level, yet here we had evidences that the blood vessel endings could also contribute to our conscious sense of touch… and also pain,” Rice said. “This mismanaged blood flow could be the source of muscular pain and achiness, and the sense of fatigue which are thought to be due to a build-up of lactic acid and low levels of inflammation fibromyalgia patients. This, in turn, could contribute to the hyperactivity in the brain.”

Current treatments for the disease have not brought complete relief to the millions of sufferers. Therapies include narcotic pain medicines; anti-seizure drugs, anti-depressants and even simple advice such as “get more sleep and exercise regularly.” Now that the cause of Fibromyalgia has been pinpointed, patients are looking forward to an eventual cure. Other expressed frustration about how much they had suffered already:

“When are they ever going to figure out that things are never “all in your head?” said one commenter. “Whenever something doesn’t fit in their tiny little understanding, they belittle the patient and tell them they are crazy. People have suffered through this since they were invented. Prescribing SSRIs for everything is not the answer any more than a lobotomy or hysterectomy was.”

The announcement has the potential to unlock better future treatments and undoubtedly has patients all over the world rejoicing that the mystery of Fibromyalgia has finally been solved.

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Crazy Health Benefits of Juicing Raw Cannabis

ontrary to popular belief, the marijuana plant is a whole lot more than just a psychoactive drug that “stoners” use to get high.

In raw form, marijuana leaves and buds are actually loaded with a non-psychoactive, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer nutrient compound known as cannabidiol (CBD) that is proving to be a miracle “superfood” capable of preventing and reversing a host of chronic illnesses.

The old saying an “apple a day keeps the doctor away” could officially be replaced by “a cup of juiced cannabis a day keeps the doctors away”.

Here is just a very SHORT list of some of the benefits of juicing raw cannabis:

1.  Antioxidants

2. Increased muscle repair

3. Increased quality of immune system which will help you fight off illness both severe and basic.

4. You can ingest higher than usual doses of cannabis this way because there will be little to no psychoactive effects.

Again , this is just a very short list and much more is still to be learned about juicing and consuming raw cannabis.

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Uncertainty… about Everything: 20 Rules for Living with Fibromyalgia

By Zona B Taylor

Having lived with Fibromyalgia and the accompanying fatigue for more than 25 years now, I feel obligated to share my experiences as well.

While I would not call what has happened over that time “recovery”, I am more likely to call it “learning my body’s rules” and learning to abide by those rules.

What do I mean by “rules”? Well, here are the ones that rule my life:

1. Don’t do the same action over and over too many times.

That means, if I feel up to taking a walk, do not go nearly as far as I think I can, or I will pay dearly for it tomorrow and the next day and the third day, too.

By about the 4th day or so, I may be able to function more or less at my usual level. Consequently, I am unable to run a vacuum cleaner, mop a floor, clean house, wash dishes by hand… due to so much repetitious movement.

Even using a computer mouse causes issues with my neck and upper back.

2. Get enough sleep.

How much is that? Whatever my body says it is. Some nights, 7-8 hours is sufficient. Other nights, 12-14 hours is what it takes.

At least once a week (usually on Friday night into Saturday) I sleep at least 12 hours. When I am having a “bad” day I may sleep up to 20 hours… but that isn’t a typical situation.

3. Take meds and supplements without fail.

There are numerous bizarre effects that show up when I miss them. Bizarre even by fibromyalgia standards.

4. Do not wear tight clothes or belts.

Unless I want to have severe pain in my middle… for the duration of the time that I wear them, plus about another day or so. It can also lead to nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, though not always.

5. Avoid new chemicals (including new medications).

It seems anything new causes either an allergic reaction or a fibromyalgia flare up.

6. Wear shoes that are flat with a wide toe box.

Change what shoes I wear at least every day or so.

7. No pantyhose (see #4).

Avoid socks that are tight around the top. I have found that diabetic socks have tops that are not as tight as “normal” socks, but they still stay put.

8. Wear underpants that are hip huggers or bikini panties…not briefs.

9. If wearing slacks, do not wear anything with an elastic waist.

It must have a plain waistband that is actually too loose in order to be able to sit in them comfortably.

10. When my skins hurts or feels strange, I should wear clothes that barely touch anywhere on my body…

Probably a loose-fitting dress. Avoid any “extras” like jewelry, scarves, etc.

11. No jewelry around my neck or wrists.

Light-weight earrings for pierced ears only. Nothing heavy or too dangly.

12. Wear sunglasses.

Light of any kind is very painful… especially if on the verge of or in the middle of a flare-up.

13. Have dimmer switches in every room of the house. See #12.

14. Avoid clothes that are uncomfortable.

Bras, tags on the inside that irritate, etc. These little things add unnecessary stress to daily living. Can be the “final straw” that pushes me across the line to a flare up.

15. Learn and respect the early signals of an impending flare-up.

When you recognize what is happening, take life very easy until the symptoms let up again. Plus at least one or two days.

16. Find what works and stick with it.

My chiropractors and I are like family after all these years. They know that when I call and say I need to be seen, that tomorrow is not what I mean. They have helped me through so many situations and kept me able to function at work for all these years with minimal loss of work time. I cannot say enough good things about my chiropractic care.

At one point, I had an awesome massage therapist who was helping me immensely. Unfortunately, he and his family moved across the country, far, far away. I have not been able to find another massage therapist who is able to achieve the same results. I so wish he and his family would move back here!

17. Reduce stress in your life.

There is good stress and there is bad stress. Either kind requires my body to respond.

Some stressors are out of my control, e.g., weather changes, dramatic temperature changes, pollen count, changes in the workplace environment, my kids getting married three weeks apart, the birth of grandbabies, my children’s growing pains and crises, etc.

Other stressors are completely in my control, e.g., sending Christmas cards, throwing parties, attending parties, shopping, going to bed late, traveling long distances by car, etc.

Find what can be eliminated (sending Christmas cards) and eliminate those things. Avoid or reduce exposure to as many of the remaining ones as possible.

18. Find something that you can do that you truly enjoy.

I love watching movies and certain television shows. I can watch old movies and reruns of “NCIS” and “Charmed” for hours… and sometimes I do. I love to read, but can no longer hold a book for long periods. Thus, I have discovered audiobooks.

19. Not every symptom is always fibromyalgia.

It is important to make sure that any new ache or pain is not something else before I just chalk it up to a new fibromyalgia symptom.

Fractures in the small bones of the foot may or may not cause severe enough localized pain for me to think it is truly broken. However, three times in my life that was what it was.

Abdominal pain is not always fibromyalgia either. Once it was thought to be my gall bladder. After that was removed and the pain stayed, they did a cardiac workup and then a full GI work up. It is now a year later, and the pain still comes and goes. My doctors do not think it is “typical fibromyalgia” pain. They want it to go away or they want to know why it is there.

Most of my headaches originate in my neck and back, or from eye strain, not fibromyalgia.

It is important to know one from the other. If it can be “fixed”, fix it. Do not suffer needlessly.

20. Stay well hydrated.

I have noticed that if I “am a quart low” on water, my joints hurt more, I have more stiffness and achiness. When I drink lots of pure water (not tea, coffee, or soft drinks), I sleep better, I rest better, I am not as stiff and sore upon awakening, and I function better throughout the day.

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17 Cancer Facts Every Person Needs to Know

How well do you know cancer?

Not the scientific and medical terms used to describe the disease but general knowledge about the #2 killer in the United States.  It’s incredible that there is so much information online about cancer – available with a few simple keystrokes – but how much do you really know?

There are so many forms of cancer, every patient case is unique, and you will never know everything (though that would be fantastic).  It can be overwhelming.

What you need is working knowledge about cancer.  Who is most at risk?  What factors increase cancer risk in the population at large?  What can you do to get or stay cancer-free?

Some of these cancer facts are common sense but you’ve probably heard the saying, “Common sense…is not so common.”  Even when you know, mentally and physically, that specific lifestyle choices increase your cancer risk…you might not act until it’s too late.

17 Cancer Facts You Need to Know Right Now

  1. Researchers worldwide agree that at least half of all cancers and cancer-related deaths are preventable.

 

  •   In 2015, an estimated 1.6 million deaths will be attributed to cancer – saving half with prevention is an excellent place to start.
  • Cancer is the single name assigned to more than 100 diseases.  Though cancer was once referred to as a “wasting disease,” it is actually the result of abnormal cells that multiply and spread out of control to various points in your body, damaging healthy cells along the way.  Most types of cancer result in tumors but cancers that affect the blood do not.
  • Only a very small percentage of cancers (less than 5%) have a genetic link, so when the “experts” tell us that most cancers are genetic, they are not being truthful. However, despite the fact that  research indicates that we likely did not inherit some mysterious “cancer gene” from our parents, most of us did inherit our “mamma’s cookbook” and were likely exposed to the same toxins as our immediate family, so cleaning up our diet, exercising, and detoxification are all extremely important.
  • Speaking of toxins, environmental factors can increase your risk of cancer.  The air you breathe, the water you drink, and the food you eat are all important.  Pollution, heavy metal toxicity, and even household cleaning products can damage the cells in your body and increase your risk of cancer.  Your home and workplace are the two places you spend the majority of your time.  Ensuring your personal safety must be a top priority.
  • More than 90% of all lung cancer cases are caused by smoking.  Interestingly, it’s not actually tobacco itself that causes the cancer – it’s the chemicals that are used in the process of making the tobacco product that cause cancer.  Quitting is the number one preventative measure you can take right now to decrease your cancer risk.  Even non-smokers are at risk from secondhand smoke.  A person dies from lung cancer every thirty seconds somewhere in the world and it is the leading cancer killer of men and women in the United States.
  • Sleep deprivation – defined as less than six hours per day – increases your risk of colon cancer.  Recent studies also showed a higher risk of cancer among those who work night shift schedules.  The benefit of healing sleep is one of the most underestimated ways to keep your body strong and cancer-free.
  • Every day, more than forty children are diagnosed with cancer – more than 14,000 per year in the United States alone.  Cancer (or more accurately the conventional “treatments” for cancer) is the #1 killer of children as a result of disease.  Today, cancer (and cancer treatments) will claim the lives of four children – more than complications from congenital birth defects, type 1 diabetes, and asthma combined.  The survival rates among children with cancer are not improving because the conventional treatments (chemo and radiation) actually cause cancer and very little emphasis is placed on finding the cause of the disease rather than merely treating symptoms (tumors) by shrinking them with carcinogenic chemicals like chemotherapy.
  • Popular cold cuts, sausage, and hot dogs contain nitrates – you’ll see them on the label as sodium nitrate and potassium nitrite.  Nitrates are chemical additives used in processed meats in order to preserve them and add flavor.  Preparation with high heat and ingestion causes a chemical reaction with the digestive fluids in your body, converting nitrates to nitrites – a known carcinogen.  Nitrates also filter into groundwater from the use of fertilizer so consider using a filter for drinking water.
  • Globally, approximately one in every eight deaths is caused by cancer.  In fact, cancer causes more deaths than malaria, tuberculosis, and AIDS combined.  Developed countries have higher incidences of cancer.  Experts believe it is a combination of diet and lifestyle that affects our overall health.
  • The most common cancer diagnosed in women cancer of the breast.  Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among women.  Breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer are the most common diseases for which women are diagnosed.
  • Lung, prostate, and stomach cancer are the most common diseases for which men are diagnosed.  Survival rates for lung cancer are less than 20%.  If you smoke and have a job where you inhale toxins, your chance of survival drops to just over 3%.
  • People aged fifty-five or older have the highest cancer risk.  Approximately 77% of all cancers diagnosed are found in men and women of this age group.
  • Research has revealed that obesity increases your risk of cancer.  It can also affect your chances of survival should you be diagnosed with cancer.  In one study of post-menopausal women with breast cancer, the survival rates were higher in women who maintained a healthy body weight.
  • You may experience no symptoms of ovarian cancer, lung cancer, or colon cancer until the cancer cells spread to other areas of your body.  Early screening is imperative to catching these cancers in time.
  • Skin cancer is the cancer diagnosed most often.  The number of detected skin cancer cases increases steadily every year. The popular myth is that exposure to the sun causes skin cancer, but this is not completely accurate. Sun exposure is actually good for you and increases your body’s production of vitamin D (via the interaction of ultraviolet light with cholesterol in your skin). Thirty minutes of early morning or late afternoon sun on your hands and face is enough to get your recommended dose of vitamin D. But you don’t want to burn, as this might cause DNA damage and eventually cancer, so be careful. But do not use sunscreen, as it filters out helpful ultraviolet light and also causes cancer.  The main chemical used in sunscreens to filter out ultraviolet light is octyl methoxycinnamate (“OMC”) which has been shown to kill mouse cells even at low doses.  Plus, it was also shown to be particularly toxic when exposed to sunshine. OMC is present in 90% of sunscreen brands! The most popular brands of sunscreens also contain other toxic chemicals (such as dioxybenzone and oxybenzone) that are absorbed through the skin where they enter the bloodstream, generate free radicals, wreak havoc on the immune system, damage the liver and the heart, and even promote systemic cancer.
  • Healthy cells have a built-in ability to self-destruct.  The scientific name for this process is called apoptosis but health writers refer to it as “cell suicide.”  This is the process by which the cell recognizes that damage is present and destroys itself to protect the rest of the body.  In cancer cells, this automatic process is absent but scientists don’t know why.  Cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and heart disease have all been linked to a breakdown in apoptosis.
  • There are foods that can naturally trigger damaged cells to self-destruct via apoptosis.  Green tea, berries, turmeric, avocados, garlic, kale, and even dark chocolate are just a few of the foods that target and destroy cancer cells.

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How to Test for Asperger’s

Asperger’s Syndrome, now called autism spectrum disorder, level 1 in the DSM-V, affects a person’s ability to communicate and socialize. People with Asperger’s have medium to high IQs and may achieve great success in life, but they struggle with social awkwardness and limited nonverbal communication skills. The symptoms of Asperger’s are shared by people with a range of other disorders, so it can be tricky to diagnose.

Part 1 of 3: Recognizing the Signs

  1. Test for Asperger's Step 1
    1
    Look for unusual nonverbal communication skills. Starting from early childhood, people with Asperger’s exhibit marked differences in the way they communicate. These differences are the most noticeable symptoms, especially during childhood, before they have been taught tools they can use to communicate more effectively.[1] Look for the following differences in communication style:

    • A tendency to avoid eye contact.[2]
    • Limited use of varying facial expressions, and/or monotone voice.
    • Limited use of expressive body language, such as hand gestures and nodding.
    • Test for Asperger's Step 2
      2
      Watch for signs of selective mutism. Selective mutism is when someone speaks only to those with whom he feels comfortable, and stays silent around everyone else. This is common among people with Asperger’s. They may speak openly with their parents and siblings, but stay silent at school and around people they don’t know very well. In many cases, selective mutism can be overcome later in life.[3]

      • Sometimes people find it difficult or impossible to speak during sensory overload, a meltdown, or in general. This may not necessarily be selective mutism; however, it is also a symptom of Asperger’s Syndrome.
    • Test for Asperger's Step 3
      3
      Determine if the person has trouble reading the social cues of others. A person with Asperger’s may have difficulty imagining how others feel, and difficulty picking up on nonverbal cues. She may be confused about facial expressions or body language that conveys happiness, sadness, fear, or pain. Here are some ways this difficulty might manifest itself:

      • The person might not recognize when she has said something hurtful, or when she’s making someone uncomfortable in a conversation.
      • A child might play too rough, not realizing that pushing or other aggressive physical contact can be painful.
      • The person constantly asks about people’s feelings (e.g. “Are you sad?” “Are you sure that you’re tired?”) because she isn’t sure how the other person feels. If the other person answers dishonestly, she may become very confused and try to seek an honest answer instead of letting it be.
      • The person will act very surprised, sad, and apologetic when told that her actions were inappropriate. It seems that she had absolutely no idea. She may feel worse than the person whose feelings were hurt.
    • Test for Asperger's Step 4
      4
      Notice one-sided conversations. Individuals with Asperger’s may not always know how to maintain a back-and-forth conversation, especially when it comes to subjects of interest to them, or moral topics like human rights. He might become so wound up in the subject matter that he misses signs that the person he’s talking to has something to say or is bored with the conversation.[4]

      • Some people with Asperger’s realize that they monopolize conversations sometimes, and are thus afraid to talk about their interests at all. If someone is hesitant to talk about his favorite subject, and seems to expect the other person to get upset or bored with him, then he may be trying to suppress this impulse for fear of social repercussions.
    • Test for Asperger's Step 5
      5
      See if the person has intense passions. Many people with Asperger’s take a special, almost obsessive interest in a few subjects. For example, a person with Asperger’s who is interested in baseball might memorize the name and stats of every player on every Major League team. Other people with Asperger’s might love writing, writing novels and spouting nuanced writing advice from a young age. Later in life, these passions can develop into successful and enjoyable careers.[5]
    • Test for Asperger's Step 6
      6
      See if the person has trouble making friends. People with Asperger’s may have trouble making friends, since they have a hard time communicating effectively. Many people with Asperger’s want to make friends with others, but lack the social skills to do so. Their avoidance of eye contact and awkward conversation attempts can be misread as rudeness or being antisocial, when really they would like to get to know people better.[6]

      • Some people with Asperger’s, especially young children, may not demonstrate an interest in interacting with others. This usually changes as they age, and they develop the desire to get along and fit in with a group.
      • People with Asperger’s might end up with just a few close friends who really understand them, or they may surround themselves with acquaintances they don’t connect with on a deep level.
      • People with autism are more likely to be bullied, and trust people who take advantage of them.
    • Test for Asperger's Step 7
      7
      Notice the person’s physical coordination. People with Asperger’s often lack coordination skills, and may be a little clumsy. They might often trip or bump into walls and furniture. They may not excel at performing heavy physical activity or sports.[7]

      Part 2 of 3: Confirming the Diagnosis
      1. Test for Asperger's Step 12
        1
        Read up on Asperger’s Syndrome to help you make decisions. Medical and psychological researchers are still in the process of learning how to correctly diagnose the disorder, as well as how it should be treated. You are likely to see different doctors and therapists take different approaches to treatment, and that can be very confusing. Reading up on your own will help you better understand the varying approaches and make decisions as to which ones are best for you or your family member.

        • Read things written by people with autism. There is a lot of misinformation about autism, and people with autism can offer the deepest insight about how it works and which treatments are the most effective. Read literature from autism-friendly organizations.
        • Organizations like the National Autistic Society or MAAP publish up-to-date information about diagnosing, treating and living with Asperger’s.[8]
        • Reading a book written by someone with Asperger’s about that experience is a good way to get insight into the disorder. Try Nerdy, Shy, and Socially Inappropriate by Cynthia Kim or Loud Hands: Autistic People, Speaking, an anthology of essays by autistic writers.
      2. Test for Asperger's Step 8
        2
        Keep a diary of symptoms you observe. Everyone exhibits social awkwardness and some of the other symptoms of Asperger’s from time to time, but if you keep a diary and take note of each instance, you’ll start to pick up on patterns. If the person really does have Asperger’s, you’re likely to see the same symptoms happening again and again, not just once or twice.

        • Write down detailed descriptions of what you observe. That way, you’ll be able to give potential doctors and therapists as much information as possible to help get a correct diagnosis.
        • Keep in mind that many symptoms of Asperger’s are shared by other disorders, like OCD or ADHD. It’s important to be open to the possibility that it’s something else (or multiple things), so this person can receive the right kind of treatment.
      3. Test for Asperger's Step 9
        3
        Take an online test. There are several online tests designed to determine whether a person might have Asperger’s. The test taker is asked a series of questions related to their social activities, favorite ways to spend time, and strengths and weaknesses to see if the common symptoms of Asperger’s seem to be present.[9]

        • The results of an online test for Asperger’s syndrome are in no way the same as a diagnosis. Rather, it’s a way to determine whether further testing might be necessary. If the test reveals a tendency towards autism, you might want to make an appointment with the family doctor to find out more.
      4. Test for Asperger's Step 10
        4
        Get your family doctor’s opinion. After you’ve taken an online test and you’re reasonably sure that a disability is present, start by making an appointment with your general practitioner. Bring your symptom journal and share your concerns. The doctor will likely ask you a series of questions and ask you to elaborate on the specifics. If the doctor shares your feeling that Asperger’s or another developmental disability might be at play, ask for a referral to a specialist.[10]

        • Having that first conversation with a professional can be an intense experience. Thus far, you may have kept your concerns mostly private. Sharing them with a doctor might change everything. But whether the person you’re concerned about is yourself or your child, you’re doing the right thing by acting instead of ignoring what you’ve observed.
      5. Test for Asperger's Step 11
        5
        See a specialist for a full evaluation. Before the appointment, do research on the psychiatrist or psychologist to whom you are referred. Make sure the person specializes in working the autism spectrum. The appointment will probably consist of an interview and a test with questions similar to the questions on the online tests. Once a diagnosis is given, the specialist will give recommendations as to how to proceed.[11][12]

        • During your meeting, don’t be afraid to ask a lot of questions about the person’s experience, diagnosis and treatment approach.
        • If you aren’t completely confident that the diagnosis is correct, seek a second opinion.

      Part 3 of 3: Taking the Next Steps

      1. Test for Asperger's Step 13
        1
        Work with a team of professionals you trust. Dealing with Asperger’s requires a multi-pronged approach with teachers, caretakers, physicians, and therapists. It’s very important to get outside help from experienced and compassionate professionals. First and foremost, find a psychologist or therapist you connect with and trust – someone you’ll be glad to have in your life for years to come as you work through the challenges that accompany autism.[13]

        • If something feels off or uncomfortable after a few therapy sessions, don’t hesitate to find someone who’s a better match for you or your child. Trust is an important element when it comes to treating Asperger’s.
        • In addition to finding a trusted therapist, you might want the insight of specialized educators, nutritionists, and other professionals who can help you navigate the special needs of you or your child.
        • Never go to a specialist who supports Quiet Hands, uses corporal punishment, physically restrains people, withholds food, insists that “a little crying” (panic) is normal, doesn’t allow you to monitor the session, or supports organizations that the autistic community considers destructive. People with autism can develop PTSD from this treatment.[14][15][16]
        • In general, if the person with autism enjoys the therapy and looks forward to going, then it’s probably good. If he seems more anxious, disobedient, or panicked, then it’s probably hurting instead of helping.[17]
      2. Test for Asperger's Step 14
        2
        Seek out emotional support. Living as a person with autism can be challenging, and learning to cope can be a lifelong process. In addition to meeting with doctors and therapists to figure out the best course of treatment, consider seeking support from the Autism NOW, ASAN, or a local Asperger’s support group. Find people you can call when you have questions, or when you just need someone to talk to who understands what you’re going through.

        • Do an online search for Asperger’s support groups in your town. There may be one associated with the schools in your area.
        • Consider attending a conference put on by the US Autism and Asperger’s Association,[18] ASAN, or another prominent group. You’ll gain access to a wealth of resources, learn about cutting-edge treatment methodologies, and meet people with whom you might want to keep in touch.
        • Join an organization run for and by people with autism, such as ASAN or the Autism Women’s Network. You can meet other people with autism while making a positive difference in the world.
      3. Test for Asperger's Step 15
        3
        Organize your life to meet your unique needs. People with Asperger’s face more challenges than neurotypicals, especially in the arena of social interaction. However, people with Asperger’s can have full, wonderful relationships – many marry and have children – and highly successful careers. Being mindful of the person’s unique needs, helping her overcome her setbacks and celebrating her strengths can give her the best chance to have a fulfilling life.

        • One essential way to make life better for a person with Asperger’s is to have a routine you stick to, since this can help her feel more secure. When you do have to switch things up, take the time to explain exactly why so the person understands.
        • Modeling social skills for someone with Asperger’s can help her learn by example. For example, you can teach the person to say hello and shake hands while making eye contact. The therapist you work with will give you the right tools to do this effectively.[19]
        • Celebrating the person’s passion and allowing her to run with it is a good way to support someone with Asperger’s. Nurture the person’s interest and help her excel at it.
        • Show the person that you love her and her autism too. The best gift to give a person with Asperger’s is accepting her for who she is.

Read More

Living with a Hypothyroid Wife

by Dana Trentini

Unless someone lives in your shoes it is hard for them to understand what hypothyroidism does to you. I have no doubt there are many people in your life that don’t get your experience with hypothyroidism. Perhaps sharing this article will help them understand your experience a little better.

Written by Palle Flodgaard

My name is Palle, and I am married to Helle Sydendal, the author of From Hypothyroid to Healthy and an advocate for hypothyroid patients.

Following my wife’s work as an active patients’ advocate, meeting thousands of patients and their relatives at her lectures and other engagements, I can’t help but notice the similarity in people’s stories.

However, one thing has struck me the most: so many are struggling with various issues in their daily lives – especially in their family life and work.

At the lectures, many people – mostly husbands – have asked me how our marriage has survived this far, how it was like for me to live with a woman suffering from hypothyroidism, and how they can support their wives.

Hypothyroidism can be hard on a marriage

For many patients, hypothyroidism can be a cruel illness to live with, especially with all its horrible symptoms. However, if you add divorce and/or maybe job loss to that, it makes it even worse – I have met a lot of people in that situation.

And there is no doubt that hypothyroidism can be hard on a marriage. As a husband, you will probably hear about this illness a lot because it affects all aspects of your life and that of your wife. Besides, you might already be a little tired of listening to her complaints, not to mention that it might not always be interesting talking about the disease.

But don’t give up just yet, as there is hope if and when she gets the right treatment.

Let me describe some of my experiences in living with an undiagnosed, later undertreated, and finally well-treated thyroid patient.

She was sick for years before she was diagnosed

First of all, I now realize that my wife had already the symptoms of hypothyroidism from the time we first met. She was always feeling freezing, always needing an extra blanket or a thick down jacket even in summertime. That was how I met her – she needed my warmth.

As years went by, more and more symptoms became known. Not only did she gain weight, she was also sleeping a lot. She suffered from preeclampsia when she gave birth to our boys.

But at the time, I didn’t know that Helle was actually ill – I just thought it was all part and parcel of getting older.

But Helle herself was convinced that something was wrong with her. Finally, she was diagnosed with hypothyroidism and was told that she needed medicine for the rest of her life, but that she would feel well again, and that her symptoms would eventually disappear. Sadly they did not.

I didn’t really realize she was sick – I was busy

Don’t think for a moment that I was actually much of a support at the beginning, even though Helle was by then already diagnosed. Sure, I knew she was sick. But I also knew that she was on medication, so she should be alright, and so I thought!

I was too busy and caught up with trying to manage both my job and almost all the housework at home like doing the dishes, preparing dinner, doing the laundry, cleaning, picking up the kids from kindergarten and school, and fixing the old house we had bought – all at the same time. I was too busy to really be conscious of my wife’s illness.

She was sleeping all day

Of course, when I had the time I sometimes wondered why my wife was always sleeping when she came home from work. Sometimes she would sleep until the next day when she had to go to work again. I wondered why she suddenly seemed to have problems with her employer – she used to be a highly valued employee who was entrusted with a lot of responsibility. She used to argue even with the Boss when he tried to interfere with her work – and more often than not she’d get her way. But suddenly, all her spirit was gone.

She forgot everything

I used to wonder why she kept forgetting everything – all the time: purse, credit card, cell phone, shopping list, where she was, and where she was going. Time and time again I would get phone calls from nice people who had found her credit card or purse. She had to have a new credit card – (and all the other cards) all the time – including new codes, that she could never remember. And new phones – we’ve spent a fortune on cellphones.

Sometimes my wife would call me from some place where she had ended up while driving home, having forgotten where she was. Or, she would tell me that she was late because she had to pull over and take a nap.

She gained and continued to gain

She also gained even more weight – a lot of weight, even though she was always following a serious diet. I couldn’t understand why. However, I did not really think much of it. After all, she had given birth to my two beautiful sons. Maybe it was only natural. It didn’t matter to me – for I love my wife.

She was seeing doctors all the time

In all this, she saw her doctor quite often and later some endocrinologist – I honestly don’t remember the details. She would often complain to me about her weight gain and about her troubles with getting back in shape. She could hardly walk, even up short stairs, without taking a break to breathe.

I listened but I didn’t really quite understand. And of course sometimes I got a little tired of talking about the disease. I just hoped the doctors would help her. However, they did not. And life went on – daily life that is.

I got my wife back

One day she told me she had found a new doctor (again!), and that she wanted to give it another try. He apparently gave her another kind of medicine – I didn’t really understand at the time the difference. I was busy.

But something happened. My wife changed, not instantaneously but gradually. Her mood changed. She was happier, and her spirit returned, slowly but surely. She then lost weight – a lot of weight. After two years of adjusting her medication, she completely looked and behaved herself once again – beautiful and full of energy.

And then she wrote a book.

Finally I understood

It was when I read the manuscript of her new book that I finally realized what she had been going through, and how ill she had been. I also came to realize how terrible she had been treated by her doctors, and how little people including me and many a doctor had understood hypothyroidism.

The book finally helped me accept and understand my wife’s illness and to realize how I could support her.

I became her memory

After Helle finally got the proper treatment, I really don’t think much anymore of her illness. She is again the person that I married 17 years ago.

But Helle still needs help and support. Hypothyroidism is chronic and if she forgets her medication, even for only a few days, the symptoms would be back. She has to take her pills three times a day.

In the beginning Helle hated when I looked inside her pill-box and told her if she had forgotten to take some of the pills. But she learned to accept it – because if she forgets her pills – the symptoms come back and she becomes forgetful and therefore forgets to take even more pills.

So I have become her memory. Every morning I give her the first pills and check that she remembers all the pills on the day before. As long as Helle takes her medication, hypothyroidism does not affect our life anymore.

What can you do?

How can you help your hypothyroid wife (or husband, girlfriend, boyfriend, relative)?

That really depends on whether s/he is well treated or still struggling just to get diagnosed or find the right dose or treatment.

If s/he is still struggling with the symptoms and/or finding the right treatment, there are many things you can do:

  1. Most importantly: remember that you love each other. Remember how you first fell in love. Help each other to recall those precious moments. You will need those to get through the difficult times ahead.
  2. Accept and understand her/his situation. It might be helpful to read about other patients’ experiences. You will realize that other patients are in the same situation and that there is hope for a normal life again.
  3. Don’t expect too much from her/him in daily life. You probably have to take up most of the practical work in and around the house.
  4. Don’t let her see the doctor alone. A person suffering from hypothyroidism will often find it difficult to explain her symptoms. Be there to support her and if necessary be her advocate. Help her get the proper treatment. And if need be, help her find another doctor.
  5. Read books about hypothyroidism – because she probably can’t concentrate or remember what she reads.
  6. Remember, there is always hope. Given the right treatment, chances are your wife will recover and be herself again.
  7. Maybe she needs help with the medication. Doses sometimes have to be regulated and adjusted. Be aware of your wife’s condition – has she changed? You will probably be the first to notice. Is she getting tired and forgetful again? Maybe she needs a raise in dose – talk to the doctor. Or is she restless and anxious? Maybe the dose is too high – talk to the doctor.

Life can become normal again

When your wife is well treated, she probably will not need that much support anymore on account of her illness, except for making sure that she does take her medication which you might need to remind her.

Also, she might need your help to explain her illness to other people. Hypothyroidism is a trivialized illness and very few know anything about the consequences and extent of the disease.

Accept that hypothyroidism will be part of your lives.

But manage it right, and hypothyroidism will have little or no impact on the way you live your life.

Read More

How to Test for Asperger’s

Asperger’s Syndrome, now called autism spectrum disorder, level 1 in the DSM-V, affects a person’s ability to communicate and socialize. People with Asperger’s have medium to high IQs and may achieve great success in life, but they struggle with social awkwardness and limited nonverbal communication skills. The symptoms of Asperger’s are shared by people with a range of other disorders, so it can be tricky to diagnose.

Part 1 of 3: Recognizing the Signs

  1. Test for Asperger's Step 1
    1
    Look for unusual nonverbal communication skills. Starting from early childhood, people with Asperger’s exhibit marked differences in the way they communicate. These differences are the most noticeable symptoms, especially during childhood, before they have been taught tools they can use to communicate more effectively.[1] Look for the following differences in communication style:

    • A tendency to avoid eye contact.[2]
    • Limited use of varying facial expressions, and/or monotone voice.
    • Limited use of expressive body language, such as hand gestures and nodding.
    • Test for Asperger's Step 2
      2
      Watch for signs of selective mutism. Selective mutism is when someone speaks only to those with whom he feels comfortable, and stays silent around everyone else. This is common among people with Asperger’s. They may speak openly with their parents and siblings, but stay silent at school and around people they don’t know very well. In many cases, selective mutism can be overcome later in life.[3]

      • Sometimes people find it difficult or impossible to speak during sensory overload, a meltdown, or in general. This may not necessarily be selective mutism; however, it is also a symptom of Asperger’s Syndrome.
    • Test for Asperger's Step 3
      3
      Determine if the person has trouble reading the social cues of others. A person with Asperger’s may have difficulty imagining how others feel, and difficulty picking up on nonverbal cues. She may be confused about facial expressions or body language that conveys happiness, sadness, fear, or pain. Here are some ways this difficulty might manifest itself:

      • The person might not recognize when she has said something hurtful, or when she’s making someone uncomfortable in a conversation.
      • A child might play too rough, not realizing that pushing or other aggressive physical contact can be painful.
      • The person constantly asks about people’s feelings (e.g. “Are you sad?” “Are you sure that you’re tired?”) because she isn’t sure how the other person feels. If the other person answers dishonestly, she may become very confused and try to seek an honest answer instead of letting it be.
      • The person will act very surprised, sad, and apologetic when told that her actions were inappropriate. It seems that she had absolutely no idea. She may feel worse than the person whose feelings were hurt.
    • Test for Asperger's Step 4
      4
      Notice one-sided conversations. Individuals with Asperger’s may not always know how to maintain a back-and-forth conversation, especially when it comes to subjects of interest to them, or moral topics like human rights. He might become so wound up in the subject matter that he misses signs that the person he’s talking to has something to say or is bored with the conversation.[4]

      • Some people with Asperger’s realize that they monopolize conversations sometimes, and are thus afraid to talk about their interests at all. If someone is hesitant to talk about his favorite subject, and seems to expect the other person to get upset or bored with him, then he may be trying to suppress this impulse for fear of social repercussions.
    • Test for Asperger's Step 5
      5
      See if the person has intense passions. Many people with Asperger’s take a special, almost obsessive interest in a few subjects. For example, a person with Asperger’s who is interested in baseball might memorize the name and stats of every player on every Major League team. Other people with Asperger’s might love writing, writing novels and spouting nuanced writing advice from a young age. Later in life, these passions can develop into successful and enjoyable careers.[5]
    • Test for Asperger's Step 6
      6
      See if the person has trouble making friends. People with Asperger’s may have trouble making friends, since they have a hard time communicating effectively. Many people with Asperger’s want to make friends with others, but lack the social skills to do so. Their avoidance of eye contact and awkward conversation attempts can be misread as rudeness or being antisocial, when really they would like to get to know people better.[6]

      • Some people with Asperger’s, especially young children, may not demonstrate an interest in interacting with others. This usually changes as they age, and they develop the desire to get along and fit in with a group.
      • People with Asperger’s might end up with just a few close friends who really understand them, or they may surround themselves with acquaintances they don’t connect with on a deep level.
      • People with autism are more likely to be bullied, and trust people who take advantage of them.
    • Test for Asperger's Step 7
      7
      Notice the person’s physical coordination. People with Asperger’s often lack coordination skills, and may be a little clumsy. They might often trip or bump into walls and furniture. They may not excel at performing heavy physical activity or sports.[7]

      Part 2 of 3: Confirming the Diagnosis
      1. Test for Asperger's Step 12
        1
        Read up on Asperger’s Syndrome to help you make decisions. Medical and psychological researchers are still in the process of learning how to correctly diagnose the disorder, as well as how it should be treated. You are likely to see different doctors and therapists take different approaches to treatment, and that can be very confusing. Reading up on your own will help you better understand the varying approaches and make decisions as to which ones are best for you or your family member.

        • Read things written by people with autism. There is a lot of misinformation about autism, and people with autism can offer the deepest insight about how it works and which treatments are the most effective. Read literature from autism-friendly organizations.
        • Organizations like the National Autistic Society or MAAP publish up-to-date information about diagnosing, treating and living with Asperger’s.[8]
        • Reading a book written by someone with Asperger’s about that experience is a good way to get insight into the disorder. Try Nerdy, Shy, and Socially Inappropriate by Cynthia Kim or Loud Hands: Autistic People, Speaking, an anthology of essays by autistic writers.
      2. Test for Asperger's Step 8
        2
        Keep a diary of symptoms you observe. Everyone exhibits social awkwardness and some of the other symptoms of Asperger’s from time to time, but if you keep a diary and take note of each instance, you’ll start to pick up on patterns. If the person really does have Asperger’s, you’re likely to see the same symptoms happening again and again, not just once or twice.

        • Write down detailed descriptions of what you observe. That way, you’ll be able to give potential doctors and therapists as much information as possible to help get a correct diagnosis.
        • Keep in mind that many symptoms of Asperger’s are shared by other disorders, like OCD or ADHD. It’s important to be open to the possibility that it’s something else (or multiple things), so this person can receive the right kind of treatment.
      3. Test for Asperger's Step 9
        3
        Take an online test. There are several online tests designed to determine whether a person might have Asperger’s. The test taker is asked a series of questions related to their social activities, favorite ways to spend time, and strengths and weaknesses to see if the common symptoms of Asperger’s seem to be present.[9]

        • The results of an online test for Asperger’s syndrome are in no way the same as a diagnosis. Rather, it’s a way to determine whether further testing might be necessary. If the test reveals a tendency towards autism, you might want to make an appointment with the family doctor to find out more.
      4. Test for Asperger's Step 10
        4
        Get your family doctor’s opinion. After you’ve taken an online test and you’re reasonably sure that a disability is present, start by making an appointment with your general practitioner. Bring your symptom journal and share your concerns. The doctor will likely ask you a series of questions and ask you to elaborate on the specifics. If the doctor shares your feeling that Asperger’s or another developmental disability might be at play, ask for a referral to a specialist.[10]

        • Having that first conversation with a professional can be an intense experience. Thus far, you may have kept your concerns mostly private. Sharing them with a doctor might change everything. But whether the person you’re concerned about is yourself or your child, you’re doing the right thing by acting instead of ignoring what you’ve observed.
      5. Test for Asperger's Step 11
        5
        See a specialist for a full evaluation. Before the appointment, do research on the psychiatrist or psychologist to whom you are referred. Make sure the person specializes in working the autism spectrum. The appointment will probably consist of an interview and a test with questions similar to the questions on the online tests. Once a diagnosis is given, the specialist will give recommendations as to how to proceed.[11][12]

        • During your meeting, don’t be afraid to ask a lot of questions about the person’s experience, diagnosis and treatment approach.
        • If you aren’t completely confident that the diagnosis is correct, seek a second opinion.

      Part 3 of 3: Taking the Next Steps

      1. Test for Asperger's Step 13
        1
        Work with a team of professionals you trust. Dealing with Asperger’s requires a multi-pronged approach with teachers, caretakers, physicians, and therapists. It’s very important to get outside help from experienced and compassionate professionals. First and foremost, find a psychologist or therapist you connect with and trust – someone you’ll be glad to have in your life for years to come as you work through the challenges that accompany autism.[13]

        • If something feels off or uncomfortable after a few therapy sessions, don’t hesitate to find someone who’s a better match for you or your child. Trust is an important element when it comes to treating Asperger’s.
        • In addition to finding a trusted therapist, you might want the insight of specialized educators, nutritionists, and other professionals who can help you navigate the special needs of you or your child.
        • Never go to a specialist who supports Quiet Hands, uses corporal punishment, physically restrains people, withholds food, insists that “a little crying” (panic) is normal, doesn’t allow you to monitor the session, or supports organizations that the autistic community considers destructive. People with autism can develop PTSD from this treatment.[14][15][16]
        • In general, if the person with autism enjoys the therapy and looks forward to going, then it’s probably good. If he seems more anxious, disobedient, or panicked, then it’s probably hurting instead of helping.[17]
      2. Test for Asperger's Step 14
        2
        Seek out emotional support. Living as a person with autism can be challenging, and learning to cope can be a lifelong process. In addition to meeting with doctors and therapists to figure out the best course of treatment, consider seeking support from the Autism NOW, ASAN, or a local Asperger’s support group. Find people you can call when you have questions, or when you just need someone to talk to who understands what you’re going through.

        • Do an online search for Asperger’s support groups in your town. There may be one associated with the schools in your area.
        • Consider attending a conference put on by the US Autism and Asperger’s Association,[18] ASAN, or another prominent group. You’ll gain access to a wealth of resources, learn about cutting-edge treatment methodologies, and meet people with whom you might want to keep in touch.
        • Join an organization run for and by people with autism, such as ASAN or the Autism Women’s Network. You can meet other people with autism while making a positive difference in the world.
      3. Test for Asperger's Step 15
        3
        Organize your life to meet your unique needs. People with Asperger’s face more challenges than neurotypicals, especially in the arena of social interaction. However, people with Asperger’s can have full, wonderful relationships – many marry and have children – and highly successful careers. Being mindful of the person’s unique needs, helping her overcome her setbacks and celebrating her strengths can give her the best chance to have a fulfilling life.

        • One essential way to make life better for a person with Asperger’s is to have a routine you stick to, since this can help her feel more secure. When you do have to switch things up, take the time to explain exactly why so the person understands.
        • Modeling social skills for someone with Asperger’s can help her learn by example. For example, you can teach the person to say hello and shake hands while making eye contact. The therapist you work with will give you the right tools to do this effectively.[19]
        • Celebrating the person’s passion and allowing her to run with it is a good way to support someone with Asperger’s. Nurture the person’s interest and help her excel at it.
        • Show the person that you love her and her autism too. The best gift to give a person with Asperger’s is accepting her for who she is.

Read More